Let's Talk
9 May, 2009,
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WELCOME

This website started as a website for the students and staff in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. I have now moved to the new School of Humanities and Social Sciences. More specifically to the new(er) Division of Linguistics and Multilingual Studies.So I suppose I could say that now this site is dedicated to the improvement of the English language of all who are interested.

I hope you will find this site useful and entertaining. I will try to update it as much as my work will allow me.

Do you have any language
related questions?
Contact me:

Francesco Cavallaro

LINKS

Grammar CC College USA
Mary Ansell
Essay writing James Cook University
Speak good English Speak Good English Movement in Singapore
Good site! Purdue University
Good online dictionary! (Download their toolbar.) Merriam-Webster
Pronunciation Englishclub.com

 

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Commonly misused words

REMUNERATION/RENUMERATION

 

Although “remuneration” looks as if it might mean “repayment” it usually means simply “payment.”

The Merriam-Webster online Dictionary says it comes from the verb TO REMUNERATE, which means:

1 : to pay an equivalent for <their services were generously remunerated>
2 : to pay an equivalent to for a service, loss, or expense [Or to RECOMPENSE].

It is often confused with “renumeration,” which simply means re-counting (counting again).

From: http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/
errors.html

One word at a time

FUSTIGATE

 

verb
1 : to beat with or as if with a short heavy club
*2 : to criticize severely Example sentence:
The incumbent senator has been fustigated by his opponent for twice voting to raise taxes.

Did you know?
Though it won't leave a bump on your head, severe criticism can be a blow to your self-esteem. It's no wonder that "fustigate," when it first appeared in the 17th century, originally meant "to cudgel or beat with a short heavy stick," a sense that reflects the word's derivation from the Latin noun "fustis," which means "club" or "staff." The "criticize" sense is more common these days, but the violent use of "fustigate" was a hit with earlier writers like George Huddesford, who in 1801 told of an angry Jove who "cudgell'd all the constellations, . . . / Swore he'd eject the man i' the moon . . . / And fustigate him round his orbit."

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.

From:
Merriam-Webster Dictionary
http://www.m-w.com
Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary
http://dictionary.cambridge.org


Use of Pronouns


Welcome to the next episode on the English pronous.

This time we will be discussing the English personal pronouns.


Personal Pronouns

Because we use them so often, the personal pronouns are the most important group of pronouns. For the same reason, they will give you the most trouble unless you are familiar with their various forms.

What is a personal pronoun?

A personal pronoun is a pronoun that shows by its form whether it refers to the person speaking, the person spoken to, or the person or thing spoken of. All the personal pronouns, with the exception of the pronoun it, can refer to persons.

As we said in the previous part of this discussion, a pronoun replaces a noun in order to avoid repetition. Subject pronouns are subjects of verbs and are found immediately or almost immediately before its verb. In English you always use a subject pronoun to construct sentences when there is no other noun as a subject.

Pronouns are divided in three categories:

First person

Second person

Third person

Singular

Plural

Singular

Plural

Singular

Plural

First person refers to the person(s) speaking (I - singular, we - plural);

Second person refers to the person(s) spoken to (you – singular, plural);

Third person refers to the person(s) or thing(s) spoken about (he, she, it – singular, they - plural).

Subject pronouns

First person

Second person

Third person

Singular

Plural

Singular

Plural

Singular

Plural

I

we

you

you

he, she, it

they

Example

Subject Pronouns
I am going home
You are
He is
She is
We are
You are
They are

 

 

 

 

 

 

Possessive Pronouns

First person

Second person

Third person

Singular

Plural

Singular

Plural

Singular

Plural

mine

ours

yours

yours

his, hers, its

theirs

My (this is a possessive adjective – NOT a pronoun) car is red hers is blue.

What colour are your (adjective) bags? Mine is black, hers is white and his is dark grey.

Object pronouns

First person

Second person

Third person

Singular

Plural

Singular

Plural

Singular

Plural

me

us

you

your

him, her, it

them

Ting Ting is being too noisy! I’ll ask her to be quiet.

Ierfan and Intan are really nice! I’ll ask them to come over for dinner on Friday.

 

In the nex editions of this webpage we will continue looking at the different forms and functions of the pronouns in English.

Stay tuned!

You liked what we've said on this page in the past? Missed an issue? Don't worry! Click on this link! All previous editorials have been saved in the ARCHIVE.

 

Did you know that?

TO TIE THE KNOT (To get married)

Some marriage ceremonies around the world actually tie together the wrists of the bride and groom.

The Latin phrase nodus Herculeus means that the groom was to loosen the bride's girdle.

In the Hindu marriage ceremony the groom knots a ribbon (or garland of flowers) around the bride's neck.

The Parsees bound the hands of the bridegroom.

The Carthaginians tied the thumbs of the bride and bridegroom with a leather lace.

in Japan the priest performing the wedding would bind the bride and grooms hands with rope during the ceremony. In modern days, you will often see the priest place a sash around their hands rather than rope.

Apparently, in Sweden illiterate sailors and soldiers of yesteryear would send a piece of rope to their sweethearts when they wanted to get married. If the rope came back with a knot in it, that meant she said "yes" to the marriage proposal.

 

From: http://www.rootsweb.com/~genepool/sayings.htm
http://www.austinchronicle.com/mrpants/language.html

 
WE NEED YOUR HELP

Each time we refresh the site, we will try to present a set of incorrectly written sentences. We will then detail why they are incorrect and suggest how they can be rewritten.

You can help by emailing us your queries and any error you have observed in your own work, or the work of your friends or students.

 

 

 

 

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